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Fresh Air Weekend: Central Park 'Exonerated 5' Member; Examining Slavery's Legacy

Yusef Salaam, shown above in 2019, reflects on his wrongful conviction in the memoir, <em>Better, Not Bitter.</em>
Yusef Salaam, shown above in 2019, reflects on his wrongful conviction in the memoir, <em>Better, Not Bitter.</em>

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Central Park 'Exonerated 5' Member Reflects On Freedom And Forgiveness: In 1990, Yusef Salaam was one of the five boys wrongly convicted in the so-called Central Park jogger case. They weren't exonerated until 2002. Salaam tells his story in Better, Not Bitter.

Shabaka Hutchings' 'Black To The Future' Is A Showcase For Black British Music: Bandleader and reed player Hutchings was born in London, but partly raised in Barbados. His new album with Sons of Kemet highlights the criss-crossing trajectories of African musical diasporas.

Slavery Wasn't 'Long Ago': A Writer Exposes The Disconnect In How We Tell History: In How the Word is Passed, Clint Smith visits eight places central to the history of slavery in America, including Thomas Jefferson's Monticello plantation and Louisiana's Angola prison.

You can listen to the original interviews and review here:

Central Park 'Exonerated 5' Member Reflects On Freedom And Forgiveness

Shabaka Hutchings' 'Black To The Future' Is A Showcase For Black British Music

Slavery Wasn't 'Long Ago': A Writer Exposes The Disconnect In How We Tell History

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