James Doubek

James Doubek is an associate producer and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast. In 2018, he reported feature stories for NPR's business desk on topics including electric scooters, cryptocurrency, and small business owners who lost out when Amazon made a deal with Apple.

In the fall of that year, Doubek was selected for NPR's internal enrichment rotation to work as an audio producer for Weekend Edition. He spent two months pitching, producing, and editing interviews and pieces for broadcast.

As an associate producer for NPR's digital content team, Doubek edits online stories and manages NPR's website and social media presence.

He got his start at NPR as an intern at the Washington Desk, where he made frequent trips to the Supreme Court and reported on political campaigns.

Facebook is launching a climate change information page in an effort to promote facts about climate change from trusted sources.

Users in the U.S., U.K., France and Germany are seeing links and information from Facebook's Climate Change Information Center starting Tuesday. It's similar to the COVID-19 information page launched in March.

Farmworkers in California are facing two crises at once: the coronavirus and exposure to dangerous air from wildfires.

Massive fires border large swaths of California's agriculture region, the Central Valley. Monitoring stations report unhealthy air across the interior of the state.

Since it was first popularized by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini in the 1920s, fascism, and accusations of it, have been a common theme in American political discourse.

Editor's note: This story contains a racial slur.

In his movie roles, Chadwick Boseman was praised for bringing dignity and humanity to icons in the fight for racial justice — figures like Jackie Robinson, Thurgood Marshall and James Brown. He also inspired millions as the superhero Black Panther.

Jason Wright joins the Washington Football Team as it confronts a series of crises: allegations of sexual harassment and bullying, the COVID-19 pandemic and changing a racist team name.

The flames from wildfires raging across Northern California did not spare Andy Pestana and Sarah Hawkins' home and farm in Vacaville, Calif., on Wednesday.

"Our barn, all of our farming equipment, our greenhouse, the house," Hawkins tells NPR's David Greene on Morning Edition.

"The house is [now] just a six-inch layer of crumbled drywall and shattered tile. And we lost all of our junior does," adds Hawkins, who is a goat breeder.

Netflix is rolling out a new feature that will let some viewers change the playback speeds of movies and TV shows.

It might seem targeted toward people who want to binge as much TV as quickly as possible. But being able to play shows slower (at half speed or three-quarters speed) or faster (at 1.25 or 1.5 speed) is also a boon for blind and deaf viewers.

For people who are blind or have low vision, the reason why involves a feature called audio description.

Democratic Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and Republican Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp are facing off in a legal battle over mask mandates.

Federal agents from the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Marshals Service and elsewhere have been in the streets of Portland, Ore., for at least a few weeks, where they've been clashing with protesters demonstrating over racial injustice and police brutality.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and local officials have downplayed any coordination between those federal forces and the Portland Police Bureau.

As school districts consider how to approach learning this fall with no sign of the coronavirus slowing, the virus has already had devastating consequences in one rural Arizona school district.

Jena Martinez-Inzunza was one of three elementary school teachers at the Hayden Winkelman Unified School District who all tested positive for COVID-19 after teaching virtual summer school lessons together from the same classroom.

Martinez's colleague and friend, Kimberley Chavez Lopez Byrd, who taught in the district for nearly four decades, died.

Merriam-Webster raised the hackles of stodgy grammarians last week when it affirmed the lexical veracity of "irregardless."

The word's definition, when reading it, would seem to be: without without regard.

"Irregardless is included in our dictionary because it has been in widespread and near-constant use since 1795," the dictionary's staff wrote in a "Words of the Week" roundup on Friday. "We do not make the English language, we merely record it."

Arizona is one of just five states that has seen new coronavirus cases climb by the thousands each day in the past couple of weeks.

The state's governor, Republican Doug Ducey, in May lifted a stay-at-home order he put in place in March so the economy could begin reopening. But a week ago, Ducey ordered bars, gyms, movie theaters and water parks to shut down again for 30 days as daily caseloads topped 3,000.

Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night — nor coronavirus — stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.

The mail is still coming. And one 11-year-old girl in Sioux Falls, S.D., wanted to show her appreciation.

How else, but by writing a letter.

Jerry Seinfeld says he's "adjusted pretty comfortably" to his new life in quarantine.

"I think there's something to be said for not socializing," he tells Weekend Edition. "It's kind of a rest for your face and your fake emotions and your repeating the same stories."

Seinfeld's new standup special, 23 Hours to Kill, starts streaming May 5 on Netflix.

He jokes in the special: "I could be anywhere in the world right now. Now you be honest. If you were me, would you be up here hacking out another one of these?"

For 33 years, Muffet McGraw coached the women's basketball team at Notre Dame, winning two national championships and leading the Fighting Irish to 848 victories.

She retired this week.

Last year, she made waves by vowing not to hire male coaches for her staff.

"We don't have enough female role models. We don't have enough visible women leaders. We don't have enough women in power," she told reporters in April 2019.

A pork processing plant in Sioux Falls, S.D., has became a hot spot of coronavirus transmission and now workers and their advocates say the company failed to communicate the risks of possible exposure and waited too long to implement safety measures.

Ari Leff is better known as Lauv. And he's been quietly gaining fans around the world with his pop music.

Leff has released singles and EPs, garnering billions of streams over the last five years.

He's finally releasing a full album: ~how i'm feeling~, stylized in the lowercase and accompanying tildes that are common in youth Internet parlance.

High schools are closed and their musicals are canceled around the country because of coronavirus concerns.

Theater kids now have no audience to showcase the numbers they've worked on, some for months and even years.

They won't have a live audience for the time being, but Broadway star Laura Benanti, who won a Tony award in 2008 for her performance in Gypsy, wanted to give student performers the next best thing — an online audience.

She put the call out on Friday.

Craigslist is a bit of an anomaly on the rapidly changing Internet. While other sites are constantly tweaking, testing new designs, finding new ways to gather data, Craigslist is remarkable for its stability.

A typical city's page looks roughly the same today as it did 15 years ago.

Valentine's Day is one of the busiest days of the year for those who work in restaurants. It's also a day that many in the industry love to hate.

Two historic bonsai trees have been stolen, and the Pacific Bonsai Museum in Federal Way, Wash., is putting out a call to get them back.

"These are priceless treasures that belong to our community. And their stories deserve to be preserved and shared broadly," museum Executive Director Kathy McCabe tells NPR. "So please bring them back."

Around 7 a.m. on Sunday morning, two thieves forced their way into the public display of the museum and made off with two roughly 50-pound bonsai: a Japanese black pine and a silverberry.

President Trump celebrated his acquittal this week by lashing out at political rivals and firing two officials who testified before impeachment investigators about his involvement in the Ukraine scandal.

Davenport, Iowa, faced some of the worst flooding in its history last year.

Flooding isn't uncommon to Iowa's third-biggest city. For years, Davenport has resisted efforts to build a flood wall on its banks of the Mississippi River.

But last spring, businesses along the riverfront scrambled to save their spaces when floodwaters breached temporary barriers.

"It didn't get as bad as it could have got," says Dan Bush, a co-owner of multiple bars near the river. "The last big event was in 1993. I don't expect it to be another 25, 27-odd years before it happens again."

The public's view of President Trump's impeachment trial is limited. In an era of ubiquitous cameras, no photographs are allowed in the Senate chamber. The only video comes from a set of cameras operated by government employees that's used by the television networks. There aren't many camera angles.

To give the public a closer view, news outlets are employing a low-tech solution.

Eddie Murphy came to Saturday Night Live at just 19 years old and became one of the show's breakout stars in the early 1980s. While former cast members of his fame routinely come back to host, aside from one brief appearance in 2015, he's been conspicuously absent from NBC's Studio 8H since then.

That changed Saturday, with Murphy returning to host the show for the first time in 35 years. He brought back favorites like Mister Robinson, Buckwheat, Gumby and Velvet Jones.

Iran's Lake Urmia was once the second-largest saltwater lake in the world, covering more than 2,000 square miles at its deepest in the 1990s.

D.A. Pennebaker, a pioneering filmmaker who chronicled key moments in music as well as politics, has died at age 94. Pennebaker helped create the cinéma vérité, or direct cinema style of documentary.

He died on Aug. 1 of natural causes at his home in Sag Harbor, New York. His son, Frazer Pennebaker, confirmed his death with NPR.

In 2012, Pennebaker received an honorary Oscar, for being a filmmaker "who redefined the language of film and taught a generation of filmmakers to look to reality for inspiration."

Alex Trebek, who has hosted the Jeopardy! game show since 1984, announced Wednesday that he has been diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer.

"Now normally, the prognosis for this is not very encouraging, but I'm going to fight this, and I'm going to keep working," Trebek said in a video announcing his illness. "And with the love and support of my family and friends, and with the help of your prayers also, I plan to beat the low survival rate statistics for this disease."

Saturday Night Live packed in a couple of special appearances from unexpected guests, including Robert De Niro and Rep.-elect Dan Crenshaw.

Here's brief roundup of the show's political bits this week:

The show opened by bidding adieu to Jeff Sessions with Kate McKinnon reprising her role as the recently ousted attorney general.

"I don't understand what I did wrong, you know," Sessions tells Vice President Pence (Beck Bennett) as he packs up his office supplies. "I put kids in cages. I said no to gays. What more did y'all want?"

Saturday Night Live returned with its second episode of the 44th season, imagining the locker room talk among Senate Republicans on a day that marked a big victory for conservatives as Brett Kavanaugh became the newest Supreme Court justice.

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