Feeding the Hungry

The effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic has left many in Southwest Colorado concerned about where they’ll get their next meal. Some are facing the difficult choice of which basic need is going to be met. KSUT’s Sarah Flower reports: 


Durango Food Bank Dump Hunger Food Drive: Ska Brewing will host the "Dump Hunger Food Drive" from 10 AM - 5 PM, this Friday and Saturday, 12/18-19, at their World Headquarters in Bodo Park in Durango. The public can drive through and donate non-perishable foods. All monetary donations will be matched by C&J Gravel.

Analysts across the country are finding that the impact of the coronavirus on food insecurities is greater than what the nation experienced during the Great Depression. With Thanksgiving being this Thursday, one group in Southwest Colorado is taking the lead on serving meals to those in need. KSUT’s Sarah Flower talks with Ann Morse, Executive Director of Manna Soup Kitchen about local food insecurities.


Mark Duggan/KSUT

Hunger is hard enough. It's even more difficult to face during a global pandemic. As unemployment has skyrocketed, so has people's reliance on food programs. From daily meal services to community food pantries, volunteers say they've seen a sharp increase in people lining up for feeding services.

One program in Cortez is known as Grace's Kitchen. It's part of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church. Doug Bleyle, the Priest-in-Charge at St. Barnabas, says the program has been serving food to disadvantaged communities for more than 20 years. During the pandemic, they've switched from a dining room environment to sack lunches. With social distancing.

KSUT Reporter Mark Duggan talked to Bleyle about how Grace's Kitchen keeps people fed during a crisis.