Part 1: Taking a Look Back at the Spanish Flu and Its Impact on the Four Corners Region

May 4, 2020

People wearing masks in San Francisco during the Spanish Flu, October 1, 1918. Photographer unknown.
Credit Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Humankind is no stranger to pandemics. The 1918 influenza infected 500 million people -  or about a third of the world's population at the time. In the Four Corners, it was particularly devastating on Native lands and in Silverton.

KSUT Reporter Mark Duggan reached out to Fort Lewis College History Professor Andrew Gulliford to find out more about the regional impact of what has come to be known as the Spanish Flu.


This is part one of a two-part interview with Andrew Gulliford. In part two, we talk about what towns in the region did to reduce the spread of the 1918 flu. And we learn more about a more recent viral outbreak in the Four Corners caused by a small rodent. Listen here.

With the outbreak of COVID-19 and the numerous and far-reaching impacts to our region, KSUT has mobilized a news team to provide coverage of both breaking news and developing stories related to the coronavirus.  Stay-tuned for weekly stories during Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered.  Stories will also be available on the KSUT website.