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The New Year brings new laws for Colorado

 The state capitol in Denver.  Several new laws go into effect in January, 2023 as a result of bills passed by the state legislature or approved by voters.
Maeve Conran
/
RMCR
The state capitol in Denver. Several new laws go into effect in January, 2023 as a result of bills passed by the state legislature or approved by voters.

Several new laws are going into full or partial effect in January in Colorado.

Twenty of these are as a result of laws passed by the state legislature, and others have been approved by voters through ballot measures.

Cage-free eggs

Starting January 1, 2023, egg producers who have more than 3,000 laying hens must demonstrate a ratio of one square foot per hen to become certified and sell eggs in Colorado.

Producers will phase into fully cage-free by 2025.

This is the result of a law passed by the state legislature in 2020.

Starting in January, consumers will see CO-COM on egg cartons, which stands for Colorado compliant.

It’s unclear how the cost of eggs will be affected by the new regulations, given other factors such as increases in the cost of energy and animal feed.

In addition, a deadly avian flu strain has significantly reduced poultry flocks, limiting the supply of eggs.

Fentanyl accountability and prevention

There are several stages of implementation of this bill that was passed by the state legislature in 2022.

Starting January 1, 2023, people convicted of possessing a substance containing fentanyl must be given a drug assessment and complete a fentanyl education program.

Jails must provide inmates with medication to prevent potential fentanyl overdoses, and must provide appropriate withdrawal management care upon release from jail.

Minimum wage increase

The state minimum wage increases from $12.56 to $13.65.

Colorado is one of 27 states hiking its minimum wage in 2023.

Plastic bag fee

Stores will charge customers a 10-cent fee for each plastic and paper bag.

This is the result of a law passed by the state legislature in 2021 that has several steps in its implementation.

Starting January 1, 2024, most stores will no longer be able to provide single-use plastic carryout bags to customers.

Paid family leave

In 2020 Colorado voters approved Proposition 118, the Paid Medical and Family Leave Initiative.

Employee payroll deductions and employer contributions start January 1, 2023.

FAMLI will start providing benefits to employees beginning January 1, 2024.

Most eligible employees will receive up to twelve weeks of leave.

Those who experience pregnancy or childbirth complications may receive an additional four weeks.

Sales tax exemption for certain hygiene products. 

Starting January, 1, 2023, sales of diapers and menstrual products will be exempt from the state sales tax.

This is the result of a law passed by state legislators in 2022.

This story was shared with KSUT via Rocky Mountain Community Radio, a network of public media stations in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and New Mexico including Aspen Public Radio.
Copyright 2023 Aspen Public Radio . To see more, visit Aspen Public Radio .

Maeve Conran
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