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A Texas city could be without water for 48 hours after a water main break

A water main break in Odessa, Texas could leave nearly 165,000 people in and around the city with little to no water for 48 hours.
City of Odessa
A water main break in Odessa, Texas could leave nearly 165,000 people in and around the city with little to no water for 48 hours.

A water line break in Odessa, Texas could leave nearly 165,000 people in and around the city with little to no water for 48 hours, according to city officials.

The water main break occurred at around 6 p.m. Monday, with crews actively working around the clock to repair the 24-inch transmission water line. The city of Odessa has not yet released details regarding the cause of the break.

"The County of Ector has suffered widespread or severe damage, injury, or loss of life or property resulting from the City of Odessa main water line failure," according to a declaration of disaster released by the Ector County Office of Emergency Management.

The loss of potable water is expected to be close to 48 hours, according to the declaration. City officials say crews are working as fast as possible to repair the break underneath the intersection of 42nd and San Jacinto streets in Odessa.

During a news conference Tuesday afternoon, Odessa Mayor Javier Joven told reporters that crews were unable to maintain the source of the break, which caused crews to take the city's water treatment plant offline.

"Because of the critical nature of the loss in pressure, we were compelled to take the plant offline, to begin the repairs that are ongoing as we speak," Joven told reporters.

Thomas Kerr, director of public works for Odessa, told reporters during Tuesday's news conference that repairs were expected to be complete sometime Tuesday evening.

"We will need to restart the plant, and start loading the pipeline system, getting people back in water," Kerr said.

The process, according to Kerr, could take another 10 to 12 hours.

Odessa city officials urged residents to boil their water prior to use for cooking, drinking, brushing teeth, making ice, washing dishes or for any other uses. Cases of water are being distributed to those affected at several locations.

In a statement, city officials said they will notify customers when the water is safe for drinking or consumption purposes.

Odessa is experiencing hot temperatures this week, according to the National Weather Service.

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